time and change

Sunset at Ponte Sant'Angelo & Basilica St. Peter, Rome

The Eternal City of Rome, Italy

Rome’s history of thousands of years is simply overwhelming. The city’s cultural heritage and visual explosion keeps you buzy for weeks – and exhausted after a couple of days.

Exploring Rome by foot

To get at least a rough idea about Rome’s development throughout the centuries, you should just start walking. The countless piazzas and tiny roads will lead you to endless masterpieces of art history. Also, you’ll get the best idea about what la dolce vita means: perfect food in tiny restaurants, wonderful wine and coffee all day long. You won’t miss anything anyways – all ways will lead to you somewhere. Sometimes.
As always, beauty comes with another side of the coin: endless masses of people. Enjoying the sights in silence and in gorgeous autumnal light, you might want to get up a bit early. Experiencing a completely empty Ponte Sant’Angelo around sunrise is irreplaceable. So is Bernini’s and Borromini’s Piazza Navona with its churches and fountains. Or Vatican City’s Basilica San Pietro. Or the center of the city: Michelangelo’s Campidoglio. Enjoying sunrise over the ancient ruins of Forum Romanum and the famous Colloseum gives an idea about what’s special about the city. It always will be the caput mundi – and it’s well deserved.


The City Hall of London during sunset

The Light of London, England

London is a truly impressive destination when it comes to photography (and honestly: anything else as well). The iconic buildings and a spectacular skyline around the river Thames makes it one of the most photogenic cities of Europe.

Chase the sunrise, hang on until sunset.

As always, next to the motive itself it is important to find the right time of the day. To be more precise: finding perfect lighting conditions. Lighting, its softness and the shadows it draws constantly changes – therefore, shooting during sunrise or sunset is extremely important to add a special touch to the images. London’s mostly even topography makes it pretty easy to capture excellent images during both golden and blue hour.
The iconic Millenium Bridge with the view towards Sir Christopher Wren’s St. Paul’s Cathedral can be prefectly shot during sunrise. So is anything shot viewing to the East: the (insert random sponsor name) London Eye seen from Westminster Bridge. The City of London with its skyscrapers and Southwalk (incl. the spectacular The Shard) seen from Southwalk Bridge.
Get some sleep and energy though, as sunset offers impressive views towards the West. Wait for those magical minutes where the sky is still illuminated enough by the set sun and the city lights already switched on. Sir Norman Foster’s City Hall. The famous British Parliament in the Palace of Westminster by Charles Barry and Augustus Pugin.
Those few moments makes it worth the effort.


Lago di Garda, Italy

Easter at Lago di Garda, Italy.

Lake Garda is the largest lake it Italy, making it one of the most popular destinations in that area. Rightly, obviously. Shaped by the glaciers of the last Ice Age, populated by a lot of adorable villages, occupied and made alive by thousands of people.

More silent parts of the lake are rare, but exist in the more rural part of the Province of Brescia, the western part of the lake.

There are countless places to find your special part of Lake Garda. Shots were made during sunrise above Gargnano at the western part of the lake. Less touristic, less hectic. Endless cliffs make it more difficult to find the perfect spot though.

The eastern and more popular part of the lake makes it perfect for astonishing sunsets, such as at Malcesine and the sensational village of Sirmione.


Sunset at Ammersee, Germany

Time and Change at Ammersee, Germany

Time and Change: The incredible sunset at the famous Ammersee in Bavaria, Germany.

Following the tradition of capturing time and change in static medium, these photographs try to record the constant changes during sunset.

Most of the photographs had been taken at the famous boat houses at Stegen at northern strand of the lake.

Equipment/Technique

The photographs are long exposure photographs. You basically need two things to achieve a similar look:

First, you will need a selection of neutral density filters (so called ND-Filters) to reduce the amount of light hitting the sensor of the camera. I usually switch between the famous (and expensive) LEE Filters (especially their exquisite gradient filters) and Haida. Usually, Haida’s ND-Filter don’t influence the color cast of a photograph that much. However, shooting in raw is an absolut must to have full control about color temperature in post production.
A common 10 stop filter reduces the amount of light by appr. 1000x times, meaning the exposure needs to be exactly 1024x times longer than without the filter.

Second, you have to use the camera’s bulb mode to extend the exposure. By using a remote control such as the Pixel Timer TW-282, the default limit of 30 seconds exposures can be ignored and prolonged. Using the bulb mode, it is possible to flatten and to smoothen fluttering surfaces like moving water. Skies will, in case light and clouds are moving fast enough, look this dramatic.  Be sure to use an extremely stable tripod to minimize camera shake as good as possible.